The Sunghwa Choe Lab

The Sunghwa Choe Lab

Seoul National University
The Sunghwa Choe Lab

The Sunghwa Choe Lab

Seoul National University
The Sunghwa Choe Lab

The Sunghwa Choe Lab

Seoul National University

Publications+ more

(2016) Overexpression of the 3’ half of the PHYB partially suppresses dwarfism in the brassinosteroid-insensitive bri1-5 mutant, Journal of Plant Biology
(2015) DNA-free genome editing in plants with preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins, Nature biotechnology
(2015) Analysis of anti-BZR1 antibody reveals the roles BES1 in maintaining the BZR1 levels in Arabidopsis, Journal of Plant Biology
(2014) Antagonistic Regulation of Arabidopsis Growth by Brassinosteroids and Abiotic Stresses, Mol. Cells
(2014) Arabidopsis gulliver1/superroot2-7 identifies a metabolic basis for auxin and brassinosteroid synergy, the Plant Journal
(2014) Darkness and gulliver2/phyB mutation decrease the abundance of phosphorylated BZR1 to activate brassinosteroid signaling in Arabidopsis, Plant Journal
(2014) The Arabidopsis gulliver2/phyB Mutant Exhibits Reduced Sensitivity to Brassinazole, J. Plant Biol.
(2013) Brassinosteroids Regulate Plant Growth through Distinct Signaling Pathways in Selaginella and Arabidopsis, PLoS One
(2013) The Regulation of Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences
(2013) Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid-overproducing gulliver3-D/dwarf4-D mutants exhibit altered responses to Jasmonic acid and pathogen., Plant Cell Rep.

Welcome to the
"The Sunghwa Choe Lab"

Brassinosteroids (BRs) collectively refer to the plant steroid hormones, which were first isolated from pollen of rape plants belonging to the Brassicaceae family. The chemical structure of brassinolide, the most active compounds among more than 50 BRs identified to date, was determined in 1979 after X-ray crystallography. However, the importance of these compounds as plant growth-promoting hormones was re-discovered in 1990s after extensive research on Arabidopsis mutants that are defective in either biosynthesis or signaling pathways of BRs. The primary effects of BRs in plant biology include stimulation of cell division and differentiation. Especially, BR deficient mutants display characteristic phenotypes attributable to retarded elongation of the cells. Furthermore, BRs are central to control xylem tissue development. More recently, their roles in regulation of plant stress responses are being revealed. We are primarily interested in genetic and biochemical elucidation of the whole biosynthetic pathways of BRs, and their regulation. In addition, we aim to reveal the evolutionary mechanisms of interaction of these pathways with other plant hormones such as auxin, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, gibberellins, cytokinins, and abscisic acid. Our understanding on BR biology will lead to development of crop plants that possess the novel traits conferring an increase in yield of grain or biomass production.